In the news: February 6 – 13, 1916

Each week, we look back at what was “in the news” the same week 100 years ago – as reported in the Cork Examiner in 1916.

By Niall Murray, Irish Examiner 

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MONDAY FEBRUARY 7, 1916

 

  • A CLONAKILTY CAPTAIN WOUNDED AT THE FRONT

Intelligence has been received that Captain Geoffrey M. Wright, of the 1st Battalion of the Royal Irish Fusiliers, son of Mr. H. T. Wright, Fern Hill, Clonakilty, and Clerk of the Crown and Peace, Cork, has arrived at a private hospital, Sussex Lodge, Phoenix Park, London, wounded while fighting in an engagement at the front, in the right shoulder and arm, and is doing as well as can be expected under the circumstances. This is the second time the gallant captain has been hurt while fighting for King and country.

 

TUESDAY FEBRUARY 8 1916

 

  • LAND AND LABOUR – CORK CITY AND COUNTY ASSOCIATION.

The chairman, referring to the high cost of living, said “rings” had been formed to destroy the homes of the working classes, and it was scandalous to think of the prices charged for articles (hear, hear).

There was no man in the community, he said, more severely hit by the increased prices than the workingman who got little assistance.

The workingmen must depend upon themselves. They must unite and endeavour to remedy their grievances; they must fight the extortionist. If they did not so unite, the workingman would have to pay still higher prices in the future.

 

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 9, 1916

 

The people of Killeagh and its surroundings were greatly grieved on Sunday last when it became known that the little, three-and-a-half-year-old daughter of Mr and Mrs Van Tichelen (their invited and esteemed Belgian guests), had succumbed to bronchitis followed by pneumonia.

The happy Van Tichelen family circle was cruelly rent asunder at the siege of Antwerp, never to reunite on earth again, when at midnight they were forced to flee in night attire, and had to face and endure untold miseries. They arrived in Killeagh on January 26th, 1915, when all possible hospitality was tendered them.

A 1916 diary....In the news (February 7-14, 1916)
Photo by Horgan, Youghal

The interment, which took place on Tuesday in the New Cemetery, was representative of all classes and creeds; the school children marched in front, and everything was done to show the grief-stricken parents and children that Ireland is still true to its past traditions. History now repeats itself; the Belgian family returns gratitude, and the tiny flower-strewn grave forms an unbreakable link to bind them with dear old Ireland. A praiseworthy and practical feature was the defraying of the funeral expenses by Mr W. S. Hunt, who was fortunately home at the time, and who has done his utmost to make the poor Belgians happy.

 

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 12, 1916

 

  • FERMOY SESSIONS – RECENT ROBBERIES.

Sergt. Lennon had two members of the tramp fraternity summoned for being drunk and disorderly.

District-Inspector Lewis said that the Urban Council had complained to him about the tramp nuisance, which was becoming a danger to the community and only quite recently a plate glass window value £20 was broken by one of this class. A fine of 5s and costs was imposed in each case.

 

READ MORE: A 1916 Diary In the News: January 30 – February 5 1916.

— Compiled by Niall Murray, Irish Examiner


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