In the news: February 14 – 20, 1916

Each week, we look back at what was “in the news” the same week 100 years ago – as reported in the Cork Examiner in 1916.

By Niall Murray, Irish Examiner 

First World War British Army funeral (of soldiers from front who died in Cork hospitals) moves along King (now MacCurtain) Street, Cork in November 1914. Ref. 416 Old black and white armies soldiers
A First World War British Army funeral procession along King (now MacCurtain) Street, Cork in November 1914. Note the Palace Theatre visible on the left.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1916

 

  • PALACE THEATRE. NEXT WEEK’S BILL.
  • ELSIE SOUTHGATE, VIOLINISTE.

The chief attraction on the excellently arranged programme which the management of the Palace Theatre has secured for next week will be the reappearance of Miss Elsie Southgate, the highly accomplished and talented violiniste, who will be accompanied by her sister, Dorothy. As a violiniste, Miss Southgate has had a distinguished career, having had the honour of appearing before four Kings, from one of whom she was presented with her celebrated Guarnerius violin, valued at £1,500… Her great ability and skill have already won the appreciation of Cork audiences, who will doubtless extent to her a cordial welcome next week… The Palascope will be a very strong feature, showing as it will the latest Chaplin success, “Charlie Shanghaied.”

 

 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1916

 

  • WATERFORD NEWS

A 1916 diary....In the news (February 15-21, 1916)

  • SEEDS CAPTURED BY GERMANS

On Thursday last Messrs Wm. Power and CO., seed merchants, O’Connell Street, received official intimation that the S.S. Kiew, which sailed from Copenhagen a short time ago with a large consignment of seeds for their order, had been captured by the Germans, and that the vessel had been taken as a prize to Swinemeunde by the enemy. The loss was covered, fortunately, by insurance. On receipt of the news, Messrs Power, with commendable enterprise, at once cabled for a fresh consignment of seeds, so that no time would be lost in meeting the demands of their customers.

 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1916

 

  • WAR MEETING AT CARRIGANIMA.

A successful meeting was held at Carriganima last Sunday in furtherance of Lord Wimborne’s recruiting scheme… During the progress of the meeting a number of young men, who were said to have been members of the local corps of Irish Volunteers marched past the meeting, and after having gone about one hundred yards disbanded, when the bulk of them returned and joined the crowd, listening until the proceedings concluded.

Halfway between Macroom and Millstreet, Co Cork, Carriganima was the intended rallying point for hundreds of Irish Volunteers from Cork city and county on Easter Sunday, April 23, 1916. The plan was for them move early on Monday to disrupt military attempts to stop German guns being brought by rail from Kerry on the line near Rathmore and Millstreet. Although the plan was deemed pointless when the arms landing was foiled days earlier, almost 500 Volunteers marched to Macroom and Carriganima.

 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1916

 

  • DEATH OF FATHER OF FOUR SOLDIERS.

The death has taken place at Kilmallock of Thomas Hanly, three of whose sons are in the army. Another was killed in the Boer War.

  • CORK, BLACKROCK & PASSAGE RAILWAY

The rail company directors’ report explained one of the main causes of an unsatisfactory report for 1915 as the closing by military authorities of the harbour village of Crosshaven, the terminus of one of its rail services.

“Shortly after the outbreak of the war the military authorities ordered all the summer residents out of Crosshaven. No visitors were allowed to enter the district by land or water without a military permit, and no excursion traffic of any kind was permitted. These regulations of course adversely affected the receipt, in August and September, 1914, and although a slight modification of the restrictions was made at the end of June, 1915, the traffic for the summer season of the present year also suffered very seriously, resulting in a nett loss of £3,078.”

 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1916

battlefield

  • FOUND ON THE BATTLEFIELD

“The above photo may be of interest to somebody in the city or county. They represent two well-known Cork sportsmen in the Irish Guards. It was found somewhere in the firing line, and sent on to us for publication by Mr. F. Murphy, Coachford.”

 

READ MORE: A 1916 Diary In the News: February 6 – 13 1916.

— Compiled by Niall Murray, Irish Examiner


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